Questions and Answers for Anxiety Disorders

Q1 What is an Anxiety Disorder?

Answer:

Anxiety is a feeling of being tense and worried about a certain issue, which is what everyone feels at some stage during most days. However an anxiety disorder is when the impact of the level of anxiety reaches a point where it interferes with a persons ability to go about their every day life. The condition is marked by emotional states that can range from mild unpleasant feelings, to intense fear that can almost paralyse someone. Anxiety disorders are the most common of all the mental related disorders. That said it is the disorder with the highest recovery back to a full normal lifestyle.

Q2 When does Anxiety Start to Occur?

Answer:

Early childhood seems to be the common start point for this disorder and again in the early teenage years. Usually when individuals become more impressionable and fall victim to pear group pressure. Left untreated this disorder often leads the person into depression, alcohol dependencies or substance abuse. The majority of people suffering anxiety issue do not take steps by themselves to get treatment, that’s why it is important for family members or friends to ensure that they do take steps to get a treatment plan in place and stick to it. Early intervention leads to a better outcome in  95% of all cases.

Q3.  What are the different types of Anxiety Disorders?

Answer:

The major types of disorders and there % of sufferers are as follows;
1. Social anxiety disorder     (13%)
2. Generalize anxiety disorder    (3-5%)
3. Panic disorder      (2-3%)
(but up to 30% will suffer a panic attack once in a while)
4. Post-traumatic stress disorder     (1-3%)
5. Obsessive-compulsive disorder    (2-3%)
6. Substance-induced anxiety disorder   (1%)
7. Clinical anxiety disorder     (6%)
8. Phobias       (5-12%)
*     The percentages of sufferers comes from “Issues in Society Volume 241 Anxiety and Depression”

Q4. Which is the worst Anxiety Disorder?

Answer:

Clinical Anxiety disorder is the worst form of this group. It is usually has a high intensity of fear and debilitation on the sufferer. This disorder runs parallel to depression in the level of emotional stress it causes.

Q5. What causes Anxiety Disorders?

Answer:

Anxiety may be a condition all by itself but more usually it is caused by an underlying psychiatric reaction to a particular situation or event in a persons life. When it is a condition, many factors cause the development of anxiety disorders. They range from learned responses, hereditary factors passed down through genes or personality traits such as where a person is very shy or withdrawn. There is also some new research, which indicates there may also be  some biochemical imbalances within the sufferer that cause the anxiety response to become over heightened, which then triggers the anxiety/panic attack.

Q6. Who suffers more from Anxiety Phobias?

Answer:

Phobias are more common in children but adults can be overcome with phobias as well. A phobia often gives rise to an unsettled state of mind and is often associated with a sick heavy feeling in the stomach. Children seem to suffer more from this anxiety disorder than adolescents and adults. This is because they do not have the learning experience, or knowledge built up over the years on which to call upon to help overcome any fearful situation they are faced with. In adults many strange phobias about specific ways things are to be done tend to appear particularly within sports personalities. Many in this group have phobias about items of clothing, which must be worn, certain food eaten, a certain piece of equipment used etc.

Q7. Isn’t Anxiety a normal feeling?

Answer:

Anxiety is a normal feeling as discussed in question 1. A low level of anxiety has been found through clinical studies  to be helpful and makes us perform at our best. Where it becomes a problem is when the level of anxiety starts to impact on the sufferer. It can range in intensity from just a feeling of being off color, right through the spectrum to a person being so debilitated as to be left lying on the ground in a curled up position, unable to even look at the world, let alone interact with others around them.